Ramadan Kareem!

August 21, 2009 by  
Filed under Multifaith Conversation

Islamic_star_and_crescent_redTo our Muslim friends who read this blog, Ramadan Kareem.

And if you are a Christian or other faith tradition, here’s a challenge: take a few minutes to study up

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on the month of Ramadan, a month-long Islamic holiday of fasting and spiritual renewal. Or go out on a limb and . . . gulp . . . ASK a Muslim about Ramadan. Doing so will not destroy your current beliefs, only expand them. Perhaps you’ll find that Christianity and Islam aren’t so different after all. Perhaps you’ll make a new friend.

Continuing in his outreach efforts to the Islamic world, President Barack Obama sets a great example:

While I’m sure that some will take this as a sure sign that Obama is secretly a Muslim himself — although he has REPEATEDLY identified himself as a Christian — to me, this is yet another promising gesture for Christian-Muslim relations. If a U.S. president can speak respectfully of another religion and its believers, why can’t the rest of us? Most Muslims and most Christians seek peace. Those who want some sort of holy war are in the minority. A loud and sometimes violent minority, but a minority nonetheless.

Learn about Ramadan. Here’s a start. And the BBC has this from a Muslim woman sharing what Ramadan is like for her.

Peace be upon you!

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A Multifaith Conversation (Conclusion)

August 14, 2009 by  
Filed under Multifaith Conversation

Washington-based journalist Imran Siddiqui leads a panel including a Muslim, Jew, Christian, Hindu and Unitarian in an open dialogue about faith.
Washington-based journalist Imran Siddiqui leads a panel including a Muslim, Jew, Christian, Hindu and Unitarian in an open dialogue about faith.

As The Author says in “A Message From God” in the chapter entitled “Which Religion? Which Holy Book?”, religion is best used as a tool to develop a relationship with God. Furthermore, just as it would be counterproductive to use a single tool to build a house, it can also be counterproductive to study a single religion to develop a relationship with God. There are things that Christians can learn from Muslims, things Muslims can learn from Jews, and things all three can learn from Hindus.

Thus, we conclude the 5-part video series: Beyond The Headlines: An Interfaith Dialogue at American University, hosted by a new friend, multimedia journalist Imran Siddiqui (check out his site: www.globalcrossover.com). I simply love the idea of bringing together a Jew, a Hindu, a Muslim, a Christian and a Unitarian. The objective is simple: looking for a common ground.

In the conclusion:  The panel promotes having an open minded approach to other religions, and explores the impact of continuing conflicts on future generations.

If you’d like to view the entire program, click below:

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A Multifaith Conversation (Part 4)

August 13, 2009 by  
Filed under Multifaith Conversation

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Washington-based journalist Imran Siddiqui leads a panel including a Muslim, Jew, Christian, Hindu and Unitarian in an open dialogue about faith.
Washington-based journalist Imran Siddiqui leads a panel including a Muslim, Jew, Christian, Hindu and Unitarian in an open dialogue about faith.

As The Author says in “A Message From God” in the chapter entitled “Which Religion? Which Holy Book?”, religion is best used as a tool to develop a relationship with God. Furthermore, just as it would be counterproductive to use a single tool to build a house, it can also be counterproductive to study a single religion to develop a relationship with God. There are things that Christians can learn from Muslims, things Muslims can learn from Jews, and things all three can learn from Hindus.

Thus, we continue with this 5-part video series: Beyond The Headlines: An Interfaith Dialogue at American University, hosted by a new friend, multimedia journalist Imran Siddiqui (check out his site: www.globalcrossover.com). I simply love the idea of bringing together a Jew, a Hindu, a Muslim, a Christian and a Unitarian. The objective is simple: looking for a common ground.

In Part 4: The panel suggests introspection and knowing one’s own faith before seeking to understand other faith traditions. Also, how today’s young people

This video will be presented in five segments, however if you’d like to view the whole thing at once, click below:

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A Multifaith Conversation (Part 3)

August 12, 2009 by  
Filed under Multifaith Conversation

Washington-based journalist Imran Siddiqui leads a panel including a Muslim, Jew, Christian, Hindu and Unitarian in an open dialogue about faith.
Washington-based journalist Imran Siddiqui leads a panel including a Muslim, Jew, Christian, Hindu and Unitarian in an open dialogue about faith.
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As The Author says in “A Message From God” in the chapter entitled “Which Religion? Which Holy Book?”, religion is best used as a tool to develop a relationship with God. Furthermore, just as it would be counterproductive to use a single tool to build a house, it can also be counterproductive to study a single religion to develop a relationship with God. There are things that Christians can learn from Muslims, things Muslims can learn from Jews, and things all three can learn from Hindus.

Thus, we continue with this 5-part video series: Beyond The Headlines: An Interfaith Dialogue at American University, hosted by a new friend, multimedia journalist Imran Siddiqui (check out his site: www.globalcrossover.com). I simply love the idea of bringing together a Jew, a Hindu, a Muslim, a Christian and a Unitarian. The objective is simple: looking for a common ground.

In Part 3: The panel promotes getting out of your comfort zone and seek out people of different faiths to explode stereotypical images that are often publicized in media.

This video will be presented in five segments, however if you'd like to view the whole thing at once, click below:

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A Multifaith Conversation (Part 2)

August 11, 2009 by  
Filed under Multifaith Conversation

Washington-based journalist Imran Siddiqui leads a panel including a Muslim, Jew, Christian, Hindu and Unitarian in an open dialogue about faith.
Washington-based journalist Imran Siddiqui leads a panel including a Muslim, Jew, Christian, Hindu and Unitarian in an open dialogue about faith.

As The Author says in “A Message From God” in the chapter entitled “Which Religion? Which Holy Book?”, religion is best used as a tool to develop a relationship with God. Furthermore, just as it would be counterproductive to use a single tool to build a house, it can also be counterproductive to study a single religion to develop a relationship with God. There are things that Christians can learn from Muslims, things Muslims can learn from Jews, and things all three can learn from Hindus.

Thus, we continue with this 5-part video series: Beyond The Headlines: An Interfaith Dialogue at American University, hosted by a new friend, multimedia journalist Imran Siddiqui (check out his site: www.globalcrossover.com). I simply love the idea of bringing together a Jew, a Hindu, a Muslim, a Christian and a Unitarian. The objective is simple: looking for a common ground.

In Part 2:  The group explores hostilities between Pakistan and India, and the role that religion plays in that conflict. Also, they explore the conflict between Israel and its Muslim neighbors.

This video will be presented in five segments, however if you’d like to view the whole thing at once, click below:

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